codaland
Saturday, June 05, 2004
       
Nagios
What is Nagios? An open source host, service and network monitoring program. Who uses it? Lots of people, including many big name companies and organizations. Where can I get it? Right here. Can I get support for it? Yes! If that didn't satisfy you, click here to get answers to some of your basic questions about Nagios.
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Friday, June 04, 2004
       
Using JAAS with Tomcat
Although it is possible to use JAAS within Tomcat as an authentication mechanism (JAASRealm), the flexibility of the JAAS framework is lost once the user is authenticated. This is because the principals are used to denote the concepts of "user" and "role", and are no longer available in the security context in which the webapp is executed. The result of the authentication is available only through request.getRemoteUser() and request.isUserInRole().

This reduces the JAAS framework for authorization purposes to a simple user/role system that loses its connection with the Java Security Policy. This tutorial's purpose is to put a full-blown JAAS authorisation implementation in place, using a few tricks to deal with some of Tomcat's idiosyncrasies.
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Using JAAS with Tomcat
Although it is possible to use JAAS within Tomcat as an authentication mechanism (JAASRealm), the flexibility of the JAAS framework is lost once the user is authenticated. This is because the principals are used to denote the concepts of "user" and "role", and are no longer available in the security context in which the webapp is executed. The result of the authentication is available only through request.getRemoteUser() and request.isUserInRole().

This reduces the JAAS framework for authorization purposes to a simple user/role system that loses its connection with the Java Security Policy. This tutorial's purpose is to put a full-blown JAAS authorisation implementation in place, using a few tricks to deal with some of Tomcat's idiosyncrasies.
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Thursday, June 03, 2004
       
Tuning Garbage Collection with the 1.4.2 Java[tm] Virtual Machine
The JavaTM 2 Platform, Standard Edition (J2SETM platform) is used for a wide variety of applications from small applets on desktops to web services on large servers. In the J2SE platform version 1.4.1 two new garbage collectors were introduced to make a total of four garbage collectors from which to choose. How should that choice be made and what are the consequences of that choice? This document will describe some of the general features shared by all the garbage collectors. It will then discuss tuning options to take the best advantage of those features in the context of the default single-threaded, stop-the-world collector. Finally, it will discuss the specific features of the three other collectors, and discuss the criteria for choosing one of the four collectors.
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JDesktop Integration Components
The JDesktop Integration Components (JDIC) project aims to make Java™ technology-based applications ("Java applications") first-class citizens of current desktop platforms without sacrificing platform independence.

JDIC provides Java applications with access to facilities provided by the native desktop such as the mailer, the browser, and registered document viewing applications. Additionally it provides the mechanisms by which Java applications can integrate into the native desktop such as registering Java applications as document viewers on the desktop and creating installer packages.

JDIC consists of a collection of Java packages (JDIC API), all with the package name prefix org.jdesktop.jdic, and a JNLP application packaging tool (JDIC Packager).
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Analyzing a Web-Based Performance Problem
Have performance problems? This article outlines a methodology and a plan of attack in solving performance problems in a web-based system.
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Wednesday, June 02, 2004
       
Experiences with using Log4J in J2EE applications
Logging with Log4J is simple and seems to be trivial and doesn't warrant a blog. However Logging in enterprise projects raises interesting requirements and possibilities.

The first question is where do you put your Logging library. With JDK Logging, you pretty much have no choice. It is always located in the classpath and loaded by bootstrap classloader, the mother of all class loaders.

Log4J brings two choices to the table. You can put it in application server's classpath or package it as a dependency library along with the EAR.
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